Romano ProdiI was not the greatest fan of Romano Prodi as Commission President, but he has until now made a reasonable job of governing Italy with a wafer-thin majority. Yet today it looks like that is going to come crashing down [BBC Story], as the government’s foreign policy proposals were defeated by 2 votes in a non-binding decision by the Senate. President Napolitano might not accept a resignation from Prodi, but it seems like Italian politics is resorting to traditional form. The opposition are calling for the government to resign – as if that is going to help the country. Some of Prodi’s policies – especially deregulation efforts – have been generally well received. With a decent government record to date, maybe an early election might be the way to put Belusconi and his Forza cronies in their place?

2 Comments

  1. Andrea

    “With a decent government record to date, maybe an early election might be the way to put Belusconi and his Forza cronies in their place?”

    Opinion Polls have generally showed Centre-Right coalition being ahead (not that they were right before 2006 GE when they showed decent lead for CL)

  2. OK, I stand corrected. From discussions with an Italian friend at the end of last week I understood the opposite. What’s the best for Prodi and the centre-left then? I wonder.

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